By: The Mom Project on April 22nd, 2020

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How to Write an Inclusive (and Parent-Friendly) Job Description

Partners | How To's

The Mom Project has a community of highly qualified, diverse talent that are actively searching for jobs with incredible employers, like you, who offer all types of positions- full-time, flexible, remote. The first step to connecting with our community is to post open roles on our marketplace. But how do you make sure you’re writing a job description that accurately reflects the role responsibilities and helps you garner interest from the right candidates?

Writing a job description can feel like a job in itself...but having worked with partners on thousands of roles, we know how! This guide is your resource for creating an effective job description to attract the best candidates on The Mom Project.

Before we get to writing, let’s talk briefly about using inclusive language. Why does the language you use matter? Studies show that men are more likely to apply for jobs when they meet only 60% of the qualifications, whereas women are more likely to apply only when they meet 100% of the qualifications.1 

Writing an inclusive job description will help ensure you get the widest range of qualified talent for your role. A few tips:

  • Stick to your true must-have requirements, so that your “nice to haves” don’t get in the way of relevant applicants.
  • Use gender neutral pronouns -- try “you” instead of “he” or “she”.
  • Avoid vague language that may sound fun, but could be unintentionally unclear or tied to gender. (Do you really need a Sales Ninja, or are you looking for a Sales Associate?)
  • Skip corporate jargon and acronyms that may keep qualified candidates from applying.
  • Call out your family-friendly policies or benefits that employees have access to.
  • Has your company received any recognition for workplace flexibility or diversity and inclusion? Highlight it!

Now, let’s get down to business - beginning with an outline of a job description:

  1. Company summary
  2. Position summary
  3. Role responsibilities
  4. Candidate qualifications
  5. Company disclaimers or benefits/perks

1. Company summary

This is your company pitch to candidates who review the job posting. It should include what your company does, what your mission is, and what sets you apart from other companies. The Mom Project partners with empowering and family-friendly companies, so make sure this comes across in your summary!

Tip: Remember, the talent applying won’t know your company name until they secure an interview, so describe your company with as much detail and pride as possible.

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2. Position summary

What are you seeking specifically for the role? Write a few lines to include the high-level objectives, required skills or tools, and the team this position will sit on. Is there a training process with this role? What will the first two weeks on the job look like? If applicable, you can include the supervision received or any direct reports.

Tip: This is your 2-3 sentence description of the position. How would you describe it to a coworker in the elevator?

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3. Role responsibilities

The responsibilities of the role are typically posted in a list format, starting with the top priorities and essential functions, working down to smaller tasks. Dive into detail about what deliverables are expected of the candidate. To build out a list on the responsibilities, ask yourself and the hiring manager:

  • What tasks will be performed?
  • What initiatives need support and execution?
  • What deliverables will this candidate work on day-to-day?
  • What deliverables will this candidate work on long-term?
  • What teams will this candidate be collaborating with, if any?

Tip: Start the bullets in the list with strong action words like develop, build, collaborate, drive, integrate, or assist.

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4. Candidate qualifications

Candidate qualifications can range from knowledge, prior experience, education, and skills. The more concrete your requirements are, the more on-target the applications you receive are. To build the qualifications list ask yourself or the hiring team:

  • What skills are necessary for this role?
  • If it’s a technical role, is any specific software experience required?
  • What abilities or competencies are needed? Avoid generic skills like “excellent communication skills”, “strong work ethic”, or “proficiency in Microsoft word”
  • What minimum level of industry experience, education, or certification is acceptable?
  • What must-have qualifications, and preferred degree or industry would I like to see listed on an applicant’s resume?

Tip: At The Mom Project, we refer to skills as Superpowers. When building profiles, our talent picks their Superpowers so our algorithm can better match them with employers.

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5. Company disclaimers, benefits, and perks

You’re posting in the The Mom Project marketplace because of the flexibility, diversity, and amazing benefits your company offers - so own it! Add your company disclaimer, list out benefits, or call out the cool perks you provide your employees. Benefits such as opportunities for professional development or mentorship programs are great selling points!

Tip: When creating your job posting in The Mom Project marketplace, you’ll be asked to include Flex Factors like schedule, ability to work remotely, and amount of travel. These factors help our algorithm better match you with qualified talent awaiting their best  opportunity. It also helps moms who have schedule restrictions apply to the right jobs, so be sure you know the specifics for the role!

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Bonus: Putting effort into writing a complete job description now will offer benefits after you hire. Leverage the job description by using it as a measure for performance reviews or as an aid for career planning.

Now that you’ve got the tips and tools for writing a job description, do you have an open role you’re ready to fill? Login and post a role.

1Why Women Don’t Apply for Jobs Unless They Are 100 Percent Qualified, Harvard Business Review